How Fascial Restriction Plays A Role On Your Posture

FASCIAL SERIES

by Lorenzo Zakinja RMT

We’ve all been there. After a string of intense workouts in a row or long hours in the office, the same complaint pops up. “I’m so stiff, my muscles ache, and everything is tight!” This is definitely the case with a lot of people. However, after getting these areas treated, often times, we may be looking too deep.

Here Lorenzo is identifying where the restrictions are before applying the release technique.

Here Lorenzo is identifying where the restrictions are before applying the release technique.

Tension in our bodies can not only be built up in our muscles, but other structures as well!

The fascial system acts as a blanket that covers and connects nearly every structure inside our bodies, including: organs, muscles, bones, nerve fibres, joint capsules, and many more. As a result, this structure plays a key role in our bodies’ mobility. If our fascia can’t move, neither can we!

Since it has so many connections within the body, we can see not only how restricted fascia affects our mobility, but our posture as well. If it's restricted, we can't move. If it's loose, we can't stand or sit properly.


SUPERFICIAL BACK LINE (SBL Fascial Line):


Our fascia acts as a blanket that covers our muscles. One of these blankets is The Superficial Back Line (SBL). It runs from our toes to our nose, while linking and supporting our entire posterior chain.

Important muscles of this system include the Erector spinae, hamstrings, calves, and the plantar surface of our feet.

The release technique commences where the neck and shoulders meet, and is applied in a downward motion to increase the length of the Superficial Back Line.

The release technique commences where the neck and shoulders meet, and is applied in a downward motion to increase the length of the Superficial Back Line.

Posturally, it’s function is to support our bodies in upright extension, and prevent us from curling forward into the fetal position.

On the flipside, too much tension in this line can create excessive extension, leading to problems such as lordosis, knee hyperextension, and plantar fascitis!

One of my favourite methods of releasing this structure is “back stripes.” To perform this technique, get the patient sitting on the edge of a table. Using either your elbows or knuckles, slowly but firmly run them down either side of their spine, from their upper to lower back

One of my favourite methods of releasing this structure is “back stripes.” To perform this technique, get the patient sitting on the edge of a table. Using either your elbows or knuckles, slowly but firmly run them down either side of their spine, from their upper to lower back


Activities such as cycling (hamstrings), wearing heels (calves), and computer work (lower back & hamstrings) can also create tension in specific areas!

Stay tuned for our PART II series, where we discuss other Fascial Lines of the body!

References: Anatomy Trains by Tom Myers

Photos by Neil Wong Media


Justin Yang